Bilbies and their burrows

Since 2014, our research group has been studying the greater bilby, a charismatic and population Australia marsupial. Bilbies excavate burrows in which they shelter during the day, before coming out at night to forage. These industrious animals dig multiple burrows, sometimes as many as 20, and use many of them at a time, swapping between…

Five Noongar eagles take to the sky

Simon Cherriman has been placing satellite-trackers on juvenile wedge-tailed eagles as part of his PhD studies.  His project is investigating juvenile dispersal in these iconic birds, comparing how birds from arid and mesic parts of WA move when they leave the nest.  Recently, five birds from the Perth region have been ‘sat-tagged’ – Simon will…

Bird Banding, long-term research, and ethics

By Bill Bateman.  Hans Christian Cornelius Mortensen, back in the late 1890s, made small bands of aluminium, marked with his name and address, and attached them to the legs of birds – from starlings through to storks.  Since then, bird ringing (in the UK and some other parts of the world, such as South Africa)…

Bilby Indigenous Knowledge Festival at Kiwirrkurra

By Stuart Dawson. Last week I attended the Bilby Indigenous Knowledge Festival in Kiwirrkurra to share expertise and findings with Indigenous rangers, landowners, scientists and land managers. These are my unique experiences at this celebration of this important vulnerable species. As we arrived in Kiwirrkurra, the most remote community in Australia, at 1am, three things…

Remote cameras in your closets?

By Peter Adams. Eventually it happens to all of us, the lab gets cluttered with equipment, space becomes a premium and inevitably you have no other option but to face facts, it’s time for the dreaded lab clean up.  I discovered boxes of old cameras that have sparked off a trip down memory lane.

Welcome to Western WEB

Western Australian researchers have joined forces to create the WWEB. Working across urban, agricultural and natural landscapes, we investigate how animals respond to human presence, but can also contribute to our quality of life. We are wildlife biologists.  Our research focuses on translational biology, where improving our understanding of the physiology and behaviour of vertebrates…